Sunny Bengal Tiger Necklace
Sunny Bengal Tiger Necklace
Sunny Bengal Tiger Necklace
Sunny Bengal Tiger Necklace
Sunny Bengal Tiger Necklace
Sunny Bengal Tiger Necklace
Sunny Bengal Tiger Necklace
Sunny Bengal Tiger Necklace
Sunny Bengal Tiger Necklace

Sunny Bengal Tiger Necklace

Regular price $69.00 AUD
/
98 in stock

Sunny Bengal Tiger Necklace

Population: 4,000

Description

The Sunny Began Tiger Necklace is handmade by artisans using glass and gold plated beads and an 18K gold plated sun charm with 18K gold plated clasp and fittings. 

The necklace measures 38cm (15 pinches) and is extendable to 44 cm (17 inches). 

Your band plants 10 Mangrove Trees to provide a home for marine and land animals, and recycles a whopping 3.08 tonnes of CO2.

Your Personalized Gift Cards

Your Band of Courage comes with an Endangered Animal gift card and a 10 Tree Planting Certificate, both of which can be personalized. They tell you all about your Endangered Animal, your Mangrove trees, and your CO2 recycling. 

Every band comes in a drawstring fabric pouch. 

Your bracelet & care

The tempered glass beads will hold their colors in freshwater (not saltwater, please), and should not be exposed to perfumes, chemicals, cosmetics and the like. 

Shipping

Your order will be processed within 2 business days of receipt. Shipments are tracked and details for the delivery service you choose are shown at checkout. 

The Bengal Tiger 

The Bengal Tiger grows up to 3 meters (10 feet) in length and weighs up to 300 kilograms (660 pounds) or a third of a tonne. A bengal Tiger can eat up to a 10th of its body weight, 30 kilograms of meat, in a single meal - that would be like a man sitting down to eat a 20 pound hamburger (half a pound is considered a large meal with some chips!).

To give you an idea of their power, this enormous animal can jump over 10 meters (33 feet), longer than a London double-decker bus! Not surprisingly these hunters pose a considerable threat to those who trespass on their territory including humans.

Today there are less than 4,000 of these wonderful creatures left in the wild, living primarily in the Indian sub-continent where there are diminishing forests (caused by deforestation to make way for agriculture) and large and growing numbers of people. Hunting and conflict with humans in a shrinking environment where wildlife, the Tigers source of food, too is diminishing.